The veto on the use of military force blocks support for Guaido in the Senate

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    The veto on the use of military force blocks support for Guaido in the Senate The head of the Venezuelan Parliament and opposition leader, Juan Guaidó. EFE

     Republicans and Democrats in the Senate have failed to agree on a resolution in support of the self-proclaimed interim president of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó, a consensus aground by the Democratic veto on the use of military forces in the Caribbean country, NBC reported Wednesday.

    Senators and advisers aware of its processing explained to the network that the initiative in support of Guaidó, of a great consensus between the two parties, will hardly be presented due to the demand of the democratic negotiators to explicitly prohibit the use of force military.

    These sources indicated that Republican Senator Marco Rubio – very influential in the Donald Trump government’s strategy of recognizing Guaidó as the legitimate president of Venezuela instead of the current president, Nicolás Maduro – is not willing to accept that the text rejects a military intervention .

    Rubio says that prohibiting the use of military force is “problematic” since the US already has diplomats and “other” personnel on the ground and that intervention is an option that should be available, according to NBC.

    For his part, the highest ranking Democrat in the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee, Bob Menéndez, argues that the resolution should not serve as an endorsement of an eventual invasion of Venezuela.

    Both Rubio and Menéndez are of Cuban origin.

    Despite this disagreement, Trump’s decision to recognize Guaidó as the legitimate president of Venezuela has generated an unusual consensus among Democrats and Republicans in the US Congress on foreign policy issues.

    Guaidó, since last January 5 president of the Venezuelan Assembly with opposition majority, proclaimed himself president “in charge” of Venezuela on January 23, days after Maduro assumed his second term.

    The United States was the first country in the world to recognize Guaidó as president, which has also been supported by several countries in Latin America, 22 of the 28 members of the European Union (EU).

    Since then, Trump has insisted that “all options”, including the military, “are on the table” to overthrow Maduro and hand over power to the until recently deputy of the opposition Voluntad Popular (VP). (EFEUSA) .-

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