Live Nation wants artists to accept pay cuts and cancellation charges for shows

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The climate of uncertainty is maintained in the world of live music, despite the fact that in recent weeks concerts have begun to be announced in a multitude of spaces with limited capacity and hygiene and social distancing measures.

It is not yet known when the rooms will be able to reopen with the normal conditions that they did before the pandemic and, to cover their backs for what may happen in the face of this unknown future, Live Nation intends for artists to accept salary cuts and cancellation charges. for shows in 2021.

In a document obtained and published by Rolling Stone, the large multinational developer details a series of changes and tells her many partners that she plans to make a series of modifications for concerts and festivals to be held during 2021.

Most of the new policies transfer financial burdens to artists – for example, the company wants to decrease the monetary guarantees promised to artists before an event by 20% across the board.

Live Nation also says that if a concert is canceled due to low ticket sales, it will give the artists 25% of the guarantee (as opposed to the 100% promoters are currently expected to pay).

Also, if an artist cancels a performance in breach of contract, the artist will pay the promoter twice the artist’s fee. A type of sanction that, as Billboard points out, is not known in the live music industry.

“We are fully aware of the importance of these changes, and would not make them without serious consideration,” wrote Live Nation, who declined to comment on Rolling Stone.

Of course, a source close to the matter has told the US publication that some of the terms detailed in the document are standard in existing concert contracts before the pandemic, and that the new aspects are part of broader negotiations with the industry. of music to navigate the future after COVID19 when the shows are back on track.

A source close to the matter tells Rolling Stone that some of the terms detailed in the memo are standard in existing concert contracts prior to the pandemic, and that the new aspects are part of broader negotiations with the music industry to navigate the post-COVID future when shows get back up and running.

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