Democratic candidates join Sanders in the pre-South Carolina primary debate

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2020 presidential candidates Mike Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP, from left, Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, Senator Bernie Sanders, an Independent from Vermont, former Vice President Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, and Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota, stand on stage ahead of the Democratic presidential candidate debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020. Beneath all of the sparring between candidates leading up to the debate is a broader strategic question that Democrats must address: Whether the best way to beat President Donald Trump in November is by reassuring moderates with kitchen-table proposals or by bolstering turnout with aggressive ideas that create a clear contrast. Photographer: Joe Buglewicz/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Democratic candidates to the White House have held a debate on Tuesday before the South Carolina primary and the ‘supermarts’ on March 3 in which they have joined their arguments against the senator by Vermont Bernie Sanders, who has already imposed rivals in New Hampshire and Nevada.

The meeting, which has taken place in Charleston, has been attended, in addition to Sanders, the former mayor of South Bend Pete Buttigieg, the senators for Minnesota and Massachusetts Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren, respectively, the former mayor of New York Michael Bloomberg, the former vice president American Joe Biden and businessman Tom Steyer.

In this context, Buttigieg has argued several times during the debate, described as “chaotic” and “vehemently” by the US media, that Sanders will sink the Democratic vote and drag with him members of the House of Representatives and the Senate in the undecided states

For the former mayor of South Bend, if the Vermont senator wins the Democratic nomination, it means “four more years of Donald Trump … and the inability to have the Senate in the hands of Democrats.”

As for Klobuchar, he has criticized that the Vermont senator’s candidacy “will alienate” the Democratic voters in the middle of the campaign with their “expensive” ideas, while Warren has claimed that she would be a more effective candidate when promulgating a progressive agenda, according to the CNN television network.

Bloomberg, on the other hand, has shaken Sanders’s defense of socialism and has alluded to the fact that Russian President Vladimir Putin is allegedly trying to interfere in the Democratic race to make Sanders the White House candidate and thus lose before US President Donald Trump, who will fight for re-election in the November elections.

“Putin thinks that Donald Trump should be the president of the United States,” Bloomberg said, while pointing out that “that is why Russia is helping you to be elected, so you can lose to him.” Biden, on the other hand, has questioned Sanders about his ability to be hard on authoritarian leaders.

However, thanks to Sanders’ favorite position after New Hampshire and Nevada, his leadership situation has become evident during the Democratic race.

In this sense, he has affirmed that his indexes are “among the highest here” and has defended his ability to be elected arguing that he has built a “campaign of energy and emotion”.

“We need the workers to return to the Democratic Party. We need young people to vote in a way we never had before. That’s what our campaign is about,” he defended.

THE DEMOCRATIC RACE
South Carolina celebrates its primaries this Saturday and will distribute 54 delegates. It is the pre-‘supermarte’ vote on March 3, with Texas and California as protagonists, in which 14 states are called to the polls and there are 1,357 delegates at stake.

Buttigieg and Bloomberg have already warned that if the party fails to make a common front against Sanders before March 3, it could achieve an “unremovable” number of delegates. Buttigieg openly warns that a Sanders self-styled democratic socialist candidate could be a presidential disaster.

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