Kidney patients face challenges when they have other comorbidities

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Kidney patients face challenges when they have other comorbidities At age 11, Paola Edith Jaguey Vázquez was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, insulin-dependent, with hypothyroidism. When he was 19 and after losing a baby he was found to have kidney failure. EFE

 Mexico, .- At age 11 Paola Edith Jaguey Vázquez was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, insulin dependent, with hypothyroidism. When he was 19 and after losing a baby he was found to have kidney failure.

In the framework of World Kidney Day, Paola tells Efe that she went to all herbal remedies to treat her but it did not help her, so she arrived at the hospital to begin her hemodialysis since she was 24 years old.

He practically lost his sight and hearing because of the high blood pressure, he had anemia and he could not do anything, he was in wheelchairs because he could not even walk.

“They told me that it was not going to last long because as I’m a patient with diabetes, everything gets complicated,” he says and confesses that during his adolescence he never had the necessary care for his diabetes.
When she was treated at the Siglo XXI National Medical Center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), she was told that the kidney donation protocol should begin.

However, his parents could not be the donors because one is “chubby” and the mother is also diabetic.
His ex-husband became the donor; After seven months of several studies, Paola underwent surgery and received the kidney she needed.

Everything was going well. Paola left behind the extreme tiredness, regained sight and hearing that she had lost because of kidney damage, so she planned to have a baby.

By the fifth month of pregnancy she began to have a lot of vomit, doctors told her it was normal but her creatinine levels indicated that her kidney was no longer working.

“They did not let me leave the hospital because it was very dangerous for the baby to get the toxins, they dialyzed me daily, I was hospitalized for two months and my son was born at 30 weeks because I also had preeclampsia,” he recalls.

Paola’s new kidney lasted only three years and three months, became inflamed and the doctors gave her medication to try to save it but the pregnancy caused her body to reject the organ she had received, “because she did twice the work for the baby”, points out

Her son is already 10 months old, she suffers from pulmonary dysplasia because she was born premature and could not develop her lungs well, while Paola returned to hemodialysis.

Although your body refused the transplant, your kidney has not been removed and will continue inside your body unless you have a tumor or cyst.

She says that for now, every third day she receives hemodialysis to cleanse her blood because even “I do not urinate at all, everything is removed through dialysis, toxins are the ones that affect me because I feel very bad”.

And although due to the pregnancy the rejection process accelerated, she assures that it is the best thing that has happened to her and her dream of becoming a mother came true.

Before being transplanted Paola created the help group “Heroes and Warriors”, where patients with kidney damage, diabetics, hypertensive, and lupus receive help.

In Mexico, 40,000 new cases of chronic renal failure are detected annually, according to the Renal Disease Data System of the United States, which places the country as one of the highest incidence worldwide.

Currently there are 14,000 patients on the waiting list to receive a kidney and each year only about 3,000 transplants are performed. (EFE)

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